Loading...
more History

THESE COPS NEED TO BE FIRED AND ARRESTED FOR ASSAULT

If this video doesn’t make your blood boil, than I don’t know what will. Please call the Hammond Indiana police dept and let them know what you think of these tyrannical officers. Hammond Police Dept: Phone:(219) 853-6490

O M G !!!!!!!!!

 Barack Obama has just signed an executive order that gives the federal government the power to apprehend and detain Americans that show symptoms of “diseases that are associated with fever and signs and symptoms of pneumonia or other respiratory illness, are capable of being transmitted from person to person, and that either are causing, or have the potential to cause, a pandemic, or, upon infection, are highly likely to cause mortality or serious morbidity if not properly controlled.”

The militarization of America’s police Trunews:

 How heavily armed are the police? Many small-town police departments now boast the same weaponry once wielded by U.S. military units in Afghanistan — including tanks with 360-degree rotating turrets, battering rams, and automatic weapons. Those weapons are today deployed against Americans suspected of crimes in their own homes. Every day, Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) teams connected to local police conduct 124 paramilitary-style raids in the U.S., according to a new report by the American Civil Liberties Union. One of them recently drew national attention when a SWAT team in Atlanta burst into a private home and threw a live flash grenade into a 2-year-old’s crib, severely injuring the toddler. Most raids by SWAT teams are conducted against suspected drug dealers, but they’ve also been deployed against a private poker game; a gay bar in Atlanta; a New Haven, Connecticut, bar suspected of serving minors; and even people suspected of credit card fraud. “Neighborhoods are not war zones,” says the ACLU in its report, “and our police officers should not be treating us like wartime enemies.” Why do police have SWAT teams? The first SWAT team was created by the Los Angeles Police Department in 1967 and reserved for the most extreme circumstances: riots, hostage scenarios, and active-shooter or sniper situations. But the “war on drugs,” coupled with the sense of danger promoted by tragedies like the Columbine massacre in 1999 and the 9/11 terror attacks, encouraged police departments even in small towns and rural areas to create special units equipped and trained for worst-case scenarios. “There’s violence in schools, and there’s violence in the streets,” said Sheriff Michael Gayer of Pulaski County in Indiana. “If driving a military vehicle is going to protect officers, that’s what I’m going to do.” How do police get military equipment? In recent years, the Department of Homeland Security has provided $35 billion to local police throughout the country to help buy weapons for “the war on terror.” The rest can be traced to the Pentagon, which has off-loaded $4.2 billion of surplus armored vehicles, rifles, and equipment to police departments… Read more at http://www.trunews.com/militarization-americas-police/#tkU3PsRCOA3izU7s.99